Tasmania

weekly photo challenge: family

Posted on Updated on

The weekly photo challenge this week is FAMILY.

We have just come back from a family holiday in Tasmania. And at all our major city stops, we took a jumping family photo!

Okay, so following the story of the hike: everyone must officially think we are mad! But let us assure you, this is just us doing something memorable and making the conventional family portrait fun for the kids (and probably adults too)!

IMG_0536

You should be able to JUST count all of the 12 family members.

 

how not to go hiking!

Posted on Updated on

Cradle Mountain
Cradle Mountain

We flew back home to Sydney two days ago! Our biggest adventure and highlight in Tasmania would be our hike in Cradle Mountain National Park. At the time, it felt like a misadventure though! So let’s set the scene a little: There were 12 of us ranging from 20 months through to 64 years old. And we went to see Cradle Mountain. One cannot come to Tasmania and NOT see Cradle Mountain. The original plan was to walk Dove Lake Circuit because it was flat and therefore would be manageable with kids, a pram and a wheelie esky (a.k.a cooler bag).

Nice and flat around Dove Lake Circuit for the pram and esky. But instead, we choose the uneven track with steps and loose wet rocks
Nice and flat around Dove Lake Circuit for the pram and esky. But instead, we choose the uneven track with steps and loose wet rocks

In the group we had: – a 64 year old with gout in his left foot – a 30-something male who had pulled a hamstring during a spontaneous beach race on our first day in Tasmania – a 7 year old who had only just recovered from a 24 hour tummy bug the day before – a 20 month old asleep in a pram What was meant to be an easy walk turned into something extremely ambitious! Instead of walking the Dove Lake circuit which was a 2 hours walk around the lake (we all deemed it would take “too long”). We decided that we would walk the Lake Lilla Track to get to Ronny Creek so we could jump on the shuttle bus back to the Visitor Centre. How hard could it be, right? The map showed that it was mostly boardwalk so off we trot. Lake Lilla Track turned out NOT FLAT nor EASY nor QUICK especially if you were hiking with the four candidates listed above. We hadn’t prepared for this walk and this is when things started to get interesting!

Off we trot towards Lake Lilla
Off we trot towards Lake Lilla

Up and down the rocky pathway through the wilderness we walked with an infant asleep in the pram. Two of the men in our entourage carried the pram so Little Miss could continue to sleep, in hope that we would reach boardwalk soon. The path was narrow, and there were loose wet rocks as we hiked in single file. On and on we went, stopping occasionally to let passer-bys overtake us. We are sure they all thought we were mad! There were moments where we stopped to discuss whether to continue or to turn back as boardwalk was simply not in sight.

Narrow path where we walked carrying the pram with the sleeping infant and the esky.
Narrow path where we walked carrying the pram with the sleeping infant and the esky.
One of our "spots" wide enough for us to have a family meeting
One of our “spots” wide enough for us to have a family meeting

And always timely, we would see other hikers coming in the direction we were headed… Let’s ask them! So we did and the responses were similar: “You guys should turn back especially with the pram!” “The boardwalk is only at the very start of the hike, the rest will be rocks and water.” “There is a lot more rocks before you get to boardwalk.” “It’s pretty rough up ahead for you guys.” But did we heed their advice? Hmm… no! We pushed on because we had come so far already! There were times when we felt prematurely excited because there was boardwalk. We would celebrate and cheer, only to find that the boardwalk lasted 50 metres and we were back to gravel, uneven paths again! Were we EVER going to find civilisation?

Thinking we had hit the jackpot and that this was the boardwalk we had been searching for
Thinking we had hit the jackpot and that this was the boardwalk we had been searching for
We found the boardwalk... finally!
We found the boardwalk… finally!

Finally 2 and a half hours later, we arrived at boardwalk! Normally, it probably wouldn’t take hikers that long but with the entourage we had and our unpreparedness, it DID take us that long. Our reward for finishing was not only boardwalk but seeing wombats at the finish line! We had one wombat climb onto the boardwalk and walk right across our path.  We also saw a baby wombat and its mum.

Wombat 1 of 7
Wombat 1 of 7
Mum and Baby Wombat
Mum and Baby Wombat

Regardless of our reward at the end – let us finish by clearly stating: THIS IS NOT HOW TO HIKE! It is so crucial to be prepared, to plan your hike to know where you are going and to notify a responsible person that you are hiking in case you don’t return. It was only after we arrived back at our motel, that we realised that we hadn’t done ANY of those things. We had one 600mL bottle of water each (if that) – we were not dressed for abrupt change in weather. We didn’t really know where we were going. We hadn’t told anyone what we were doing. We had changed our original walk plans and turned it into a hike. What was meant to be only an hour or two at Cradle Mountain National Park became a 3 hour visit. We can laugh about it now, safe and sunburnt but wouldn’t have been laughing if something dire had happened out there. Call us crazy or foolish, we learnt our lesson, we won’t be going unprepared again for bush walks or hikes!

tassie here we come

Posted on Updated on

So Christmas is now behind us and New Year is about to come knocking! We will be bringing in 2014 in Hobart this year. It’s the second year in a row that we will not be in Sydney!

Seriously?! Where does the time go? We cannot believe that this time last year, we were on a Caribbean cruise and this year, we are trying to think of what to pack for Tasmania.

We’ve googled the forecast for the next few days and the temperature ranges so much: from the lows of 9 to the highs of 28. A mix of winter and summer clothes are needed here!

Courtesy of The Weather Channel

This is a family holiday, we have 12 people aged between 1 years old (our niece) through to 64 years old (the patriarch of the family). The last time we did this, there was only 10 of us and we were driving a mini-van around Western Australia…  After that experience, we have decided this time to split up into two cars for our sanity!

So our itinerary for this 10-day trip goes a little something like this:

Flying into Hobart for a few days, onwards to Bicheno for a few more, up north to Launceston and Sheffield to finish off. There will be day trips in between no doubt but these will be our “hubs”.

Thinking back to our visit here back in 2008: we are looking forward to eating fresh fruit and visiting the different farms, seeing wildlife and the beauty of nature… and who doesn’t love a good ole road trip!!

you can farm anything

Posted on Updated on

00000184Tasmania seemed to have a farm for everything: there are potato farms, lettuce farms, poppy farms, honey farms, cheese farms, lavender farms. Let’s talk about some of the farms we visited.

We certainly did not go hungry in Tassie. There was delicious and fresh food everywhere. Driving around the state, there are numerous fruit farms you can visit. We visited three: Hillwood Strawberry Farm, Kate’s Berry Farm and Sorrell Fruit Farm. 00000277We had NO idea that there were so many types of berries. So for 10 days we indulged on cherries, strawberries, waffles and sundaes! The great thing about these farms is that you can pick your own fruit if you are that way inclined.

00000006Fresh seafood is also not lacking here. There are salmon farms to visit where you can feed the fish and then there are places where you can eat fish (not necessarily the same fish you saw at the farms). While we were down on the east coast, we ate at an amazing Japanese place, Kabuki in Swansea. Lovers of seafood will NOT be disappointed in Tasmania.

00000296

00000203But let’s not forget the final stop for us… the chocolate farm – well, its registered name would probably be the Cadbury Factory! That was quite an experience. We saw them making, wrapping, packing, stacking the chocolate. We got to eat lots of chocolate on the tour too. We walked through the the factory with our hair nets, white lab coats and shoe protectors… Willy Wonka eat your heart out! The one place we did not get to see was the FORBIDDEN FACTORY – actually, it wasn’t really called that. It’s the part of the factory where Flake and Twirl are made. The recipe and process is so top secret, Cadbury could not risk the secret getting out!